Team Daiwa

Auburn Sports & Marine

G. Loomis

Tail-Weighted Cut-Plug Herring

 

The roll of a herring is mysterious concept.  The right roll is credited with fast limits from barren water, while the wrong roll is often the whipping post of an unproductive day.  That’s all fine, but what is unusual is how the desired roll seems to change over the years.  It’s a moving target.  I was ingrained that to catch Chinook the roll of the bait must be slow.  However, recent techniques now call for a faster roll.

 

From what I’ve witnessed, I now aim to spin herring like a bullet. Getting a bait to spin like a bullet can be tough.  To make it easier, I cheat.  Instead of looking for the perfect combination of cut angle and front hook position, I tail-weight the bait to keep it spinning in line with the front.  It’s simple, easy, and at a quick troll speed, productive. 

 

1.      Start by tying your hooks with a much greater distance between them than normal.

 

 

 

2.      Cut the bait at a double angle.  I’ve found that I prefer shallower angles than many of the cutting guides, but they work great too.  After cutting, remove guts.

 

 

3.      Start the trailer hook into the bait by coming through the short side, above the bait’s lateral line.  Pull the hook through.

 

 

4.      Bring this hook back to about an inch in front of the bait’s tail.  Punch it straight through the bait and pull it all the way through.

 

 

5.      Position the lead hook shallow in the stomach cavity and bring it straight out of the top of the bait.  The trailing hook should be right on or just behind the tail of the bait, in perfect position to maximize strikes.

 

Your bait is ready to go. As you pull it, you'll notice that the trailing hook adds just enough pressure that the whole bait spins in-line. This is a rig for covering some water. If you're slow trolling small spots, it may not spin for you. Pick up the pace a little and it comes to life.

 

 

 

Your bait is ready to go. As you pull it, you'll notice that the trailing hook adds just enough pressure that the whole bait spins in-line. This is a rig for covering some water. If you're slow trolling small spots, it may not spin for you. Pick up the pace a little and it comes to life.


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